Universal Access To All Knowledge
Home Donate | Store | Blog | FAQ | Jobs | Volunteer Positions | Contact | Bios | Forums | Projects | Terms, Privacy, & Copyright
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload

Reply to this post | See parent post | Go Back
View Post [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Jul 4, 2009 8:07am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Leaving Texas, 4th Day Of July

A little beyond my usual, BUT you pick my fav representation of the "Americana" aspect of Hunter and the Boys (JS).

Think we were all babbling on about this song, and others, esp BEWom, that represent the best of Hunter's efforts on this front (again, what we loosely termed "Americana" and all know what we mean by it even if we can't precisely define it). It appeals to the likes and interests of the two of us, I suppose, similar to our interests in our "Western Heritage" as alluded to in Contract, and maybe even touching on notions of independence, cynicism with gubermint, and the like...brotherhood and making your way in this uncertain world when all you have to really count on is your family, and the friends you make into family via shared depth of experience and love of...well, of things like the DEAD.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: Earl B. Powell Date: Jul 4, 2009 11:01am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Leaving Texas, 4th Day Of July

I could go on and on about this vein of Hunter's writing. The moral ambiguity..."ain't that heaven sent" the frontier mentality and the freedom of movement in big country. The whole song appeals to me as an anthem for the West. The appeal is that although one of the great "cowboy numbers, it's vague enough to get inside and create your own understanding of the story...even the title.

It's not surprising to me that later on Garcia and Grisman sought out these morally relative tunes as not only great songs but historic documents. One that comes to mind is Dreadful Wind And Rain, which has a much more Kentucky or Tennessee feel like BEW seems to for me.

There are others, but they all have this tension between good and evil, the human frailty of morally justifying great sin, a great sense of time and place, and most importantly the religious message that out of all God created, only man is empowered with and bears the burden of free choice.

....an appropriate topic for a day like this.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: elbow1126 Date: Jul 4, 2009 9:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Leaving Texas, 4th Day Of July

Yeah both JS and BEW seem to have a similar appeal to me as well. I also think they are examples of Hunter's most descriptive story telling. The whole sequence of "leaving texas, fourth day of july, imo has little to do with the plight of Jack and Shannon and more a means of providing a backdrop for their plight. I never get tired of hearing it.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Jul 4, 2009 9:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Leaving Texas, 4th Day Of July

Yep, my feelings exactly! Coupled with the following lines especially...just like lines in StSt, they never get old.